Studio Organizing

I am so fortunate to have my dining room to use as a craft area.  I am not really a tidy person so I am surprised to find myself so interested in organizing my studio.  I can only think that it’s a product of necessity.  After spending a lot of time searching for fabrics and tools I realized that I could get projects completed with less frustration if I put things in order.

IMG_0301 IMG_0302 IMG_0303

Yellow Makes a Fellow Happy

Tropical Purse 001

Just a touch of yellow.

 

 

Have you ever really thought about why you like that cute little yellow house on the corner or the one yellow plant in your garden that catches your eye every day?

I think it’s because it makes you happy.  My mom did her whole bedroom in yellow.  Overdone, I thought.  Yellow wallpaper, yellow bedspread and she even had orange and yellow shag carpeting throughout the entire house.  Crazy!  But, she loved it and I am starting to see why.

I have noticed that when I add just a touch of yellow, it makes the quilt come alive and draws your eye in.

The sun gives us light and warmth and life.  The same applies as we create a quilt.  Of course not all quilts would look good with splashes of yellow but a highlight of some sort will set a quilt apart from the rest.  It could be the color red or orange or a special pattern that accentuates the color contrasts.

Okay, I admit, I am a little color crazy.  Probably over the top but it cheers me up.  Blame it on my mother.  She was unique, colorful and would wear just about any color or style.  She had eyeglasses that flared up at the corner, with rhinestones.  I miss my crazy mom.  She had Alzheimer’s the  20 years of her life but everybody still loved her.  She looked for the good in people and people saw the good in her.  I hope I am just like her.

Mom, second in from rightMy mom is 2nd in from right.

Don’t Copy; Make it Your Own

022As I was searching for tutorials on bindings, I ran across a few websites that did not want their information copied in any form and it caused me to look at the copy write laws in regards to exactly how it applies to the art craft industry.

The U.S. copyright code rules can be located at:  http://www.copyright.gov/title17

If you buy a pattern, make the project from the pattern and then sell it, you probably are infringing on copywriting laws.  You can copy projects for your own use or to give as gifts but  you cannot sell them.  They need to be your own work, coming entirely from your own inspiration.

So get ideas from patterns but don’t copy unless you have permission from the owner or it is a copy write free or it’s public domain.  Patterns issued before 1923 are generally considered public domain.

Most artists don’t have a problem with coming up with their own ideas and inspiration; that’s what make this craft so enjoyable.  Coming up with new ideas.  The best part of a project is when that spark lights and you start jotting down that inspired thought.  As beginners, we need to glean through the tutorials and projects to get the structural  “how to make it” ideas and then learn to combine those thoughts into your own creation.

Where do you get your best inspiration from?

 

Misc. Quilting Tips

 

TIPS FROM ME;

To enlarge small art quilts; use borders and extend stitching or applique onto border.

For small art quilts:  Instead of making a sleeve, I use D Rings.  Hand stitch the D ring’s straight edge to the backing at top left and right and use the curved edge of the D ring to slide onto nail.  I found a pack of 50 for $12.95 from Country Brook Design Inc.  on Amazon.com.

 

TIPS from www.aliceinstitches.com

 

Washing Fabric:  Fold long lengths of fabric into arm-length sections and safety pin along the top before pre washing to eliminate tangling in washing machine.

When arranging fabrics by value, squint to see if a fabric jumps out at you.  It’s easier to spot a piece that is out of place.

To display your work in progress for getting a better perspective; cover your design wall with felt, flannel or pellon fleece.

Chain piecing:  Use a scrap of fabric as a starter when chain piecing.

Pin Basting your quilt layers together:  Use #2 safety pins.  Start from the center of your project and work out any wrinkles that form along the way.

Use clean pizza box lids for storing blocks or cut pieces of fabric. (I use  cardboard for separating my fused pieces. J)

Run your needle and thread through a fresh dryer sheet to eliminate tangling in your thread. (I have also heard that dryer sheets are good for getting fusing material off your iron) J

Put batting in dryer for 15 to 20 minutes before layering it with your quilt. It takes out wrinkles and will be easier to use.

Misty Fuse is an ultra thin fusible  product that is easy to quilt through and won’t add bulk.

Easy Way to Finish a Small Art Quilt

Be sure to check out www.quiltingdaily.com,  it is a wonderful website instructional tutorials for art quilts plus free downloads.

Here is a sample of what you can learn from them.

Quilting Daily wrote:

On their Quilting Arts Workshop™ video Improvisational Fused Quilt Art: Create Beautiful Art Quilts the Easy Way, these experienced, award-winning quilt artists show several options for finishing their quilts.

Here is a very simple technique that Frieda demonstrates.

1. Create a frame by fusing fabric to both sides of a piece of Timtex® interfacing.

Timtex is a good choice because it is firm without being bulky and you can stitch and cut through it easily, says Frieda.

For complete instructions visit Interweave at www.guiltingdaily.com